Chinese  |  English
News
Location >> Home >> News
Tasting Kopi Luwak Coffee
Published:2013-04-18 Hits:2289

At the invitation of Professor Jianfeng Feng, the Centre’s Director, members of the Centre were given a taste of kopi luwak coffee. Two kinds of coffee were purchased, the legendary kopi luwak Coffee and normal America coffee. Everyone around tasted both of them, and then chose the one they thought was kopi luwak coffee. The result was that more than half the people made the wrong choice. So what is kopi luwak coffee and what’s so special about it?

 

Kopi luwak, or civet coffee, refers to the beans of coffee berries once they have been eaten and excreted by the Asian Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus). The name is also used for marketing brewed coffee made from those beans.

 

Producers of the coffee beans argue that the process may improve coffee through two mechanisms, selection and digestion. Selection occurs if the civets choose to eat coffee cherries containing better beans. Digestive mechanisms may improve the flavor profile of the coffee beans that have been eaten. The civet eats the berries for the beans' fleshy pulp, then in the digestive tract, fermentation occurs. The civet's proteolytic enzymes seep into the beans, making shorter peptides and more free amino acids. Passing through a civet's intestines the beans are then defecated with other fecal matter and collected.

 

Although kopi luwak is a form of processing, not a variety of coffee, it has been called the most expensive coffee in the world with retail prices reaching €550 / US$700 per kilogram. The price paid to collectors in the Philippines is closer to US$20 per kilogram.

 

Kopi luwak is produced mainly on the islands of Sumatra, Java, Bali, and Sulawesi in the Indonesian Archipelago. It is also widely gathered in the forest or produced in the farms in the islands of the Philippines (where the product is called kape motit in the Cordillera region, kape alamid in Tagalog areas, and kape melô or kape musang in Mindanao island), and in East Timor (where it is called kafé-laku). Weasel coffee is a loose English translation of its Vietnamese name cà phê Chồn, where popular, chemically simulated versions are also produced.

 

Copyright@Centre for Computational Systems Biology, Fudan University       Technical Support: weicheng interconnection

Address: 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433, People's Republic of China